Uncovering new thermal and mechanical behavior at the nanoscale using coherent extreme ultraviolet light

Author
Abstract
<p>Tremendous recent progress in nanofabrication capabilities has made high-quality single atomic\&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.6em;">layers and nanostructures with dimensions well below 50 nm common place, enabling unprecedented\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">access to materials at the nanoscale. However, tools and techniques capable of characterizing\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">the properties and function of nanosystems are still quite limited, leaving much of the\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">fundamental physics that dominates material behavior in the deep nano-regime still unknown.\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Further understanding gained by studying nanoscale materials is critical both to fundamental science\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">and to continued technological development. This thesis applies coherent extreme ultraviolet\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">(EUV) light from tabletop high harmonic generation to study nanoscale systems on their intrinsic\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">length and time scales (nanometers and femtoseconds, and above), specifically following thermal\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">transport and acoustic dynamics. These studies have shown where and how nanostructured material\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">properties can be quite different from their bulk counterparts. This has in turn allowed us to\&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">develop new theoretical descriptions to guide further work.</span></p>
Year of Publication
2015
Degree
Ph.D.
Number of Pages
188
Date Published
05-06-2015
University
University of Colorado Boulder
City
Boulder
Advisors - JILA Fellows
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