Virtual AMO Series

Quantum point defects: Can these defects be less, well, defective?

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Abstract: Point defects in crystals are the solid state analog to trapped ions. Thus these “quantum defects”, which can be integrated into solid-state devices, have gained popularity as qubit candidates for scalable quantum networks. In this talk, I will introduce some of the basic quantum defect properties desirable for quantum network applications.

Photoemission delays in molecules

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Abstract: Attosecond chronoscopy has revealed small but measurable delays in photoionization, characterized by the ejection of an electron on absorption of a single photon. Ionization-delay measurements in atomic targets provide a wealth of information about the timing of the photoelectric effect, resonances, electron correlations and transport. However, extending this approach to molecules presents challenges, such as identifying the correct ionization channels and the effect of the anisotropic molecular landscape on the measured delays.

Speed-ups for Quantum Algorithms with Easier Inputs

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Abstract: The difficulty of solving a problem is often input dependent. For example, if you are searching an unordered list for an item, it is easier to find one if there are multiple copies. Quantum algorithms should also do better on easier inputs, but prior work for an important class of query algorithms only gives an improvement if you know ahead of time that you have an easier input. We designed an algorithm that matches the complexity (up to log factors) of the prior algorithm, but without knowing the difficulty of the input in advance.