Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP)

Understanding and Modeling the Mysterious Dropout of Radiation Belt Electrons

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Abstract: The discovery of Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts in 1958 revealed the hazardous radiative environment for spacecraft operating within. Understanding, modeling, and eventually predicting the dynamics of energetic electrons in the radiation belts have long been targets that space physicists have pursued. Since the launch of NASA Van Allen Probes in 2012, significant progress has been achieved in understanding the strong enhancement of relativistic electrons in the radiation belt.

Measuring the stratosphere: what balloons are really doing

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Absract: The Earth’s stratosphere, which sits above the troposphere, is a difficult place to make measurements. The highest-flying aircraft can only reach the lowermost portion of the stratosphere, while space-based sensors orbiting well above are limited by technique. Balloons can profile in situ from the surface up to approximately 35 km. Thus, they are a critical measurement platform for investigating the stratospheric constituents and processes that play important roles in regulating Earth’s climate.

Ultraviolet Mars: The Search for More Science

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Abstract: Tremendous new insights into the Martian atmosphere have been achieved in recent years by two ultraviolet spectrographs built at LASP: the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission, and the Emirates Mars Ultraviolet Spectrometer (EMUS) aboard the Emirates Mars Mission (EMM). Both instruments have far exceeded their design goals in science return.

Earth Science Applications: Lessons Learned

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Abstract: NASA Earth Science has put significant attention towards enabling uses of Earth science information to support decision making activities by public and private sector organizations. In addition to supporting technical innovations, NASA also pursued several programmatic innovations to help the Earth science community develop capacity in engaging with users, designing projects, and enabling results.