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Research Highlights

Published: Tue, 06/20/2017 - 3:15pm

The Kapteyn-Murnane group has come up with a novel way to use fast bursts of extreme ultraviolet light to capture how strongly electrons interact with each other in materials. This research is important for figuring out how quickly materials can change their state from insulating to conducting, or from magnetic to nonmagnetic. In the future such fast switching may lead to faster and more efficient nanoelectronics.

In this work, graduate student Cong Chen, research associate Zhensheng Tao, and their colleagues used sequences of attosecond (10-18 s) bursts of extreme ultraviolet light to compare how long it took an electron to be emitted from the same energy levels, or bands, in two different metals––copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni).

In the past, scientists thought that the photoelectric effect, in which a high-energy photon kicks out an electron from a material, was instantaneous. More recently, with the advent of shorter and shorter laser pulses, scientists have been able to investigate such super-fast processes directly. And, they have discovered many surprises. In Chen’s and Tao’s work, the researchers...

Published: Apr 10, 2005

Andrew Hamilton and Jason Lisle, who received his Ph.D. in astrophysical and planetary...

Published: Apr 03, 2005

A high-powered JILA collaboration led by JILA Fellows Jun Ye and Chris Greene is making...

Published: Apr 03, 2005

Three years ago Jun Ye decided to apply an old idea for amplifying and stabilizing continuous-...

Published: Mar 31, 2005

Pete Roos, Tara Fortier, Xiaoqin Li, Ryan Smith, Jessica Pipis, and Steve Cundiff are using a...

Left to their own devices, deuterium atoms would attach themselves to cold specks of soot...

Triatomic hydrogen ion (H3+) has many talents. In interstellar clouds,...

The race is on! Two mice chase one another around a curvy, roughly elliptical white stripe....

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