Events

Thu, April 26 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Sandeep Sharma,
University of Colorado
Thu, April 26 3:30pm
JILA h-bar
JILA Fun Day
National Pretzel Day

Thu, April 26 4:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
Propagation of sound in 2D Bose gases

Sandro Stringari ,
University of Trento
Fri, April 27 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
Starbursts and AGN as Drivers of the Physical Conditions in the Dense Molecular Gas in Galaxies

George Privon,
University of Florida
Fri, April 27 12:00pm
JILA Auditorium
JILA Public Seminar
Life After JILA

Ben Bloom
Fri, April 27 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Manipulating Energy and Spin in Molecular Semiconductors

Sean Roberts,
University of Texas at Austin

Abstract/Details

Negligible spin orbit coupling in many organic molecules creates opportunities to alter the energy of excited electrons by manipulating their spin. In particular, molecules with a large exchange splitting have garnered interest due to their potential to undergo singlet fission (SF), a process where a molecule in a high‐energy spin‐singlet state shares its energy with a neighbor, placing both in a low‐energy spin‐triplet state. When incorporated into photovoltaic and photocatalytic systems, SF can offset losses from carrier thermalization, which account for ~50% of the energy dissipated by these technologies.  Likewise, compounds that undergo SF’s inverse, triplet fusion (TF), can be paired with infrared absorbers to create hybrid structures that upconvert infrared light into the visible range. However, integrating materials that undergo SF or TF with existing electronics remains challenging as the efficacy of these processes depends strongly on how molecules order in the solid state. I will summarize work aimed at identifying critical structure‐function relationships that guide SF within perylenediimide (PDI) films. By adding functional groups at key locations along the PDI backbone, we can force these molecules to adopt specific structures in the solid state. Guided by electronic structure calculations, we have used this approach to optimize the electronic coupling between PDIs such that they undergo SF with near quantitative efficiency. In addition, I will discuss the process of transferring triplet exciton pairs from PDI films to silicon. Silicon is an ideal triplet acceptor due to its dominance within the solar marketplace and the energetic matching of its bandgap (1.1 eV) with the PDI triplet energy (~1.2 eV). However, band misalignment between these materials can produce a type II heterojunction that facilitates charge transfer rather than exciton transfer. In this scenario, separated carriers can experience a binding interaction at the silicon:PDI interface that drives them to recombine. Using electronic sum frequency generation (ESFG), an interface selective technique, we map how the electronic structure of both silicon and PDIs are modified at their junction. Preliminary data suggests PDI crystallites experience significant strain when deposited on solid substrates such as silicon, which can narrow their bandgap. Implications for exciton extraction will be discussed.  Research Site: https://robertslabut.weebly.com/group-members.html
Fri, April 27 10:30pm
Duane Physics Room G126
CTQM Seminar
TBA

Andreas Karch,
University of Washington
Sat, April 28 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Sink or Swim!

Mathias Weber,
JILA, University of Colorado
Sat, April 28 2:30pm
Duane Physics Room G1B30
Saturday Physics Series
Ultrafast Photography

Andreas Becker,
University of Colorado
Mon, April 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Next Generation of Milky Way Survey Science

John Bochanski,
Rider University

Abstract/Details

Large surveys, such as 2MASS, SDSS and RAVE have led to tremendous advances in the understanding of Milky Way structure and kinematics over the last two decades. These surveys paved the way for two that will revolutionize our understanding of the Milky Way: Gaia and LSST. The combination of these two surveys will offer precise distances and kinematic information for billions of stars, producing the most detailed map of our Galaxy and its surroundings. I will review some recent highlights using survey data, and discuss the bright future of Milky Way survey science.
Tue, May 01 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Physics Department Colloquium
The Quantum Way of Doing Computations

Rainer Blatt,
University of Innsbruck

Abstract/Details

Since the mid-nineties of the 20th century, it became apparent that one of the centuries’ most important technological inventions, computers in general and many of their applications could possibly be further enhanced by using operations based on quantum physics. Computations, whether they happen in our heads or with any computational device, always rely on real physical devices and processes. Data input, data representation in a memory, data manipulation using algorithms and finally, data output require physical realizations with devices and practical procedures. Building a quantum computer then requires the implementation of quantum bits (qubits) as storage sites for quantum information, quantum registers and quantum gates for data handling and processing as well as the development of quantum algorithms. In this talk, the basic functional principle of a quantum computer will be reviewed. It will be shown how strings of trapped ions can be used to build a quantum information processor and how basic computations can be performed using quantum techniques. The quantum way of doing computations will be illustrated with analog and digital quantum simulations. Ways towards scaling the ion-trap quantum processor will be discussed.
Wed, May 02 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Colin Broholm,
Johns Hopkins University

Abstract/Details

TBA
Thu, May 03 4:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
Spatial and spin correlations of cold few-body systems

Doerte Blume,
University of Oklahoma

Abstract/Details

Quantum correlations play a key role across many areas of physics. They drive quantum phase transitions, govern the structure of the periodic table and nuclear chart, are used to classify the complexity of certain numerical problems, and form the heart of quantum enhanced metrology. Atomic few-body systems have historically played a pivotal role in the understanding of quantum correlations. Over the past decades, ever more sophisticated preparation and detection schemes for ultracold atoms have been developed. As a consequence, ultracold few-atom systems have emerged as prototype systems with which to study the build-up of correlations with unprecedented control as a function of the interaction strength and the number of particles. This talk will summarize our recent work on spatial and spin correlations of few-body systems that are characterized by a large two-body s-wave scattering length.
Fri, May 04 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
NASA’s Juno Mission to Jupiter: What’s Inside the Giant Planet?

Fran Bagenal,
LASP, CU Boulder

Abstract/Details

Juno’s principal goal is to understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter.Underneath its dense cloud cover, Jupiter safeguards secrets to the fundamentalprocesses and conditions that governed our solar system during its formation. As ourprimary example of a giant planet, Jupiter can also provide critical knowledge forunderstanding the planetary systems being discovered around other stars. With itssuite of science instruments, Juno is investigating the interior structure, mappingJupiter's intense magnetic field, measuring the distribution of water and ammonia inthe deep atmosphere. JUNO is also the first spacecraft to fly over Jupiter’s auroraand measuring both the energetic particles raining down on the planet and the bright“northern & southern lights” they excite. A huge bonus is the small public outreachcamera that is taking fantastic images of Jupiter’s beautiful clouds. The images –some science, some art – are processed and shared by the public around the world.NASA’s JUNO mission was launched in August 2011 and has been in orbit over Jupiter’spoles since 4th July 2016.
Sat, May 12 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Power, Grace, Wisdom, and Wonder: The Physics of The Game of Thrones!

Rebecca Thompson,
University of Colorado
Wed, May 30 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Colin Broholm,
Johns Hopkins University
Fri, June 08 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
Fast Coherent Differential Imaging for Exoplanet Imaging

Benjamin Gerard,
University of Victoria, British Columbia

Abstract/Details

Direct detection and detailed characterization of exoplanets using extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) is a key science goal of future extremely largetelescopes and space observatories. However, quasi-static wavefront errorswill limit the sensitivity of this endeavor. Additional limitations forground-based telescopes arise from residual AO-corrected atmosphericwavefront errors, generating short-lived aberrations that will average intoa halo over a long exposure, also limiting the sensitivity of exoplanetdetection. We develop the framework for a solution to both of theseproblems using the self-coherent camera (SCC), to be applied toground-based telescopes, called Fast Atmospheric SCC Technique (FAST).Simulations show that for typical ExAO targets the FAST approach can reach~100 times better in raw contrast than what is currently achieved with ExAOinstruments if we extrapolate for an hour of observing time, illustratingthat the sensitivity improvement from this method could play an essentialrole in the future ground-based detection and characterization of lowermass/colder exoplanets.
Sat, June 16 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Blackholes!

Andrew Hamilton,
JILA, University of Colorado
Fri, September 07 8:00am
Millenium Harvest House Hotel, Boulder
JILA Conference
Jin-Fest: A Celebration of Deborah Jin's Scientific Career

Multiple Speakers

Abstract/Details

Conference dates: September 7 - 8, 2018. For full details, see the conference website at: https://jila.colorado.edu/jin-fest

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