Events

Mon, November 27 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Relevance of Astronomy to the Earth Sciences

Robert Anderson,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Mon, November 27 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Alpine Ice on Planet Earth: Glaciers and Their Rocky Cousins

Robert Anderson,
CU

Abstract/Details

Alpine ice varies from pure ice glaciers to partially debris-covered glaciers, to rock glaciers defined by their compete debris cover. In many mountain ranges of the planet today, including our own in Colorado, the few pure ice glaciers are truly pathetic, hunkered in nooks and crannies where avalanches can feed them, their toes pulled in to minimize exposure to radiation. The valley heads are instead populated dominantly by rock glaciers that number in the hundreds. These rock-cloaked glaciers represent some of the most identifiable components of today’s cryosphere in these settings, and their over-steepened snouts pose often-overlooked hazards to travel in alpine terrain. They serve as conveyor belts on which rock is pulled away from the base of cliffs. I will describe numerical models designed to capture the full spectrum of glacier behavior, and that therefore include ice dynamics, rock dynamics and the feedbacks between them. I will also explore the glacier response to climate histories.
Wed, November 29 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Jacob Corn

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, November 29 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Sridhara Dasu,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, November 30 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
How to tie a (linear optical) field into a knot

Mark Dennis,
University of Bristol

Abstract/Details

It is a challenging question to write down a function from real 3-dimensional space to the complex numbers such that the preimage if zero (say) is a given knot or link. If, in addition, the function appears as a solution of some physically interesting partial differential equation, or minimizes some physically motivated functional, then the knotted field might be realisable in nature. I will discuss our approach and (partial) solution this problem applied to such knotted fields in coherent optical fields (i.e. laser beams), but with applications to other systems such as knotted vorticity lines in fluids. If there is time, I will also describe how random fields (which model modes of chaotic wave systems) naturally contain a tangle of many knotted nodal lines.
Fri, December 01 10:30am
Duane Physics Room G126
CTQM Seminar
From Weyl semimetals Weyl nodal surfaces

Sergej Moroz,
TU Munich

Abstract/Details

The advent of topological insulators in the last decade deepened our understanding of interplay of topology and symmetries in band insulators. In last years the main interest in the field shifted towards systems with band degeneracies and led to the experimental discovery of Weyl semimetals. In this talk I will first review how the Weyl equation appears in condensed matter physics and will explain how topology protects Weyl point degeneracies. Later I will summarize our recent work, where we considered three-dimensional fermionic band theories that exhibit Weyl nodal surfaces defined as two-band degeneracies that form closed surfaces in the Brillouin zone. We demonstrate that topology ensures robustness of these objects under small perturbations of a Hamiltonian. This topological robustness will be illustrated in several toy models that exhibit nodal surfaces protected by unitary or anti-unitary symmetries.
Sat, December 02 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Rocks on Mars!

Brian Hynek,
University of Colorado
Mon, December 04 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The continuing saga of supergranulation

Mark Rast,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Wed, December 06 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Craig Crew

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 06 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Mark Saffman,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, December 07 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Andrei Bernevig,
Princeton University
Fri, December 08 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
A New Approach for Estimating the Mass of the Milky Way Using the Ensemble of Classical Satellite Galaxies

Nicolas Garavito, Ekta Patel,
University of Arizona

Abstract/Details

High precision proper motions are currently available for approximately 20% of the Milky Way's known satellite galaxies. Often, the 6D phase space information of each satellite is used separately to constrain the mass of the MW. In this talk, I will discuss the Bayesian framework outlined in Patel et al. 2017b to make inferences of the MW's mass using satellite properties such as specific orbital angular momentum, rather than just position and velocity. By extending this framework from one satellite to a population of satellites, we can now form simultaneous MW mass estimates using the Illustris-Dark cosmological simulation that are unbiased by high speed satellites such as Leo I (Patel et al., submitted). Our resulting MW mass estimates reduce the current factor of two uncertainty in the mass range of the MW and show promising signs for improvement as upcoming ground- and space-based observatories obtain proper motions for additional MW satellite galaxies.
Fri, December 08 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Excitons, Disorder, and Nonequilibrium Transport in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

William Tisdale,
MIT

Abstract/Details

In nanostructured materials, the short length and time scales over which energy moves can manifest in transport behavior that deviates from classical constitutive laws. Using a combination of ultrafast laser spectroscopy, time-resolved optical microscopy, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, I will show how these effects manifest in assemblies of colloidal quantum dots (QD) and atomically thin 2D semiconductors, which are promising components of next-generation photovoltaic and lighting technologies. In particular, I will demonstrate the effect of structural and energetic disorder, the role of dimensionality and surface chemistry, and the self-organization of these nanomaterials into ordered superstructures.  
Mon, December 11 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

Beth Willman,
University of Arizona, /LSST

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 13 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Donald Bryant

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 13 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Lindley Winslow,
MIT
Sat, January 27 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Speed!

Eric Cornell,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, January 29 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Wen-fai Fong,
University of Arizona
Tue, January 30 2:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
TBA

Markus Grenier,
Harvard University
Sat, February 24 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
The Chemistry of Cooking!

David Nesbitt,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, March 05 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Nate Kaib,
University of Oklahoma
Sat, March 17 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Much Ado About Absolute Zero!

Paul Beale,
University of Colorado
Mon, March 19 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

John Wisniewski,
University of Oklahoma
Mon, April 02 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Shelley Wright,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 16 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Quinn Konopacky,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 23 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Daryl Haggard,
McGill University
Sat, April 28 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Sink or Swim!

Mathias Weber,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, April 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Rebekah Dawson,
Penn State
Sat, May 12 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Power, Grace, Wisdom, and Wonder: The Physics of The Game of Thrones!

Rebecca Thompson,
University of Colorado
Sat, June 16 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Blackholes!

Andrew Hamilton,
JILA, University of Colorado

No front page content has been created yet.