Events

Mon, September 25 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Murmurs from Dormant Black Holes: The Theory and Observation of Tidal Disruption Events

Nick Stone,
Columbia University

Abstract/Details

In recent years, dozens of powerful, multiwavelength transients have been seen from the photometric centers of inactive galactic nuclei. The light curves of these explosions rise and decay over timescales of weeks to months, their generally thermal spectra peak in the UV or soft X-ray, and their bolometric energy output is greater than the vast majority of supernovae. I will review the observational evidence that these flares are tidal disruption events (TDEs), the death throes of stars that have been torn apart by supermassive black holes (SMBHs). I will also present my own, primarily theoretical, work to understand the surprisingly complex physics underlying TDEs. This is a field with important open questions: what are the stellar dynamical processes that feed stars to SMBHs? How do eccentric debris streams from the disrupted star circularize into an accretion disk? What are the emission mechanisms that power the flares we observe? I will propose answers to each of these puzzles, and highlight upcoming observational tests that may answer them decisively. Although the current observational sample of TDEs is modest, upcoming time domain surveys such as ZTF, eROSITA, and LSST will increase our sample size by orders of magnitude. Resolving the theoretical questions I will discuss in this colloquium is the critical step toward using these flares as unparalleled probes of SMBH demography.
Wed, September 27 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
The Quest for the New Standard Model: Searching for BSM Physics with Rare-Isotope Beams

Kyle Leach,
Colorado School of Mines

Abstract/Details

The development of the Standard Model (SM) has been one of the crowning achievements in modern physics, and is the cornerstone of current subatomic studies. Despite its success, the SM is known to be incomplete, and providing limits on possible physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) is crucial to our understanding of the natural universe.  Although they are generally complex, atomic nuclei can be exploited as a laboratory for these studies through the use of rare-isotope beams (RIBs).  The production of these short-lived, very exotic isotopes has opened new avenues of research in our search for BSM physics in the era of the LHC.  This work is at the precision and sensitivity frontiers, and helps to bridge the gap between atomic, nuclear, and particle physics using novel, state-of-the-art detection techniques. In this talk, I will use these topics to highlight the significant role of the atomic nucleus in our ongoing search for additional generations of quarks, new descriptions of the weak interaction, and light dark matter. These studies play a critical role in providing the groundwork for our quest to develop the "New Standard Model".
Thu, September 28 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Barry Bradlyn,
UIUC
Fri, September 29 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Multiphase Chemistry in Indoor Environments

Jon Abbatt,
University of Toronto

Abstract/Details

Although the role of multiphase chemistry that occurs between gases and surfaces in the atmosphere, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets, is now well recognized, the comparable chemistry that occurs with indoor surfaces is not as well characterized. This seminar will address the general topic focusing on the fundamental chemistry that results. Both results from laboratory experiments as well as measurements from genuine indoor environments will be presented. Topics include the nature of the oxidation that results when highly unsaturated condensed-phase organics, such as those in skin oil, are oxidized by ozone leading to the formation of Criegee radicals and higher-order oxidation products. As well, interesting chemistry results when a floor is washed with sodium hypochlorite solution (i.e. bleach), leading to the heterogeneous uptake of HOCl vapour by surfaces throughout a room. This chemistry likely proceeds via HOCl uptake across carbon-carbon double bonds. Finally, although the formation of HONO via interactions of NO2 with wet surfaces is now well recognized, new measurements in a residential home allow us to examine the detailed mechanism that sustains HONO at levels substantially higher indoors than outdoors. Photolysis of HONO is one of the major OH sources in indoor environments.
Sat, September 30 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Go With the Flow!

Janet deGrazia,
University of Colorado
Mon, October 02 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Pushing Down and Out: characterizing hot Jupiters in detail and expanding into new regimes

Emily Rauscher,
University of Michigan

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, October 04 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Shankar Balusubramanian

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, October 04 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Kathryn Zurek,
LBNL
Thu, October 05 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Hua Chen,
Colorado State University
Thu, October 05 4:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
Self-bound droplets of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

Blair Blakie,
University of Otago

Abstract/Details

Reception in Hbar at 3:30 pm.  Recent experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates of dysprosium [1] and erbium [2] atoms have observed the formation of dilute quantum gas droplets that can preserve their form, even in the absence of any external confinement [3]. These droplets occur when the long-ranged dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms dominates over the short-ranged contact interaction. In this regime meanfield theory predicts that the condensate is unstable to collapse, however the Lee-Huang-Yang quantum fluctuation corrections to the meanfield energy [4] can stabilize the system as one or many finite sized droplets. I will discuss our current understanding of these droplets, and introduce a new type of nonlinear Schrodinger equation used to describe their equilibrium and dynamical properties.    References: [1] H. Kadau, M. Schmitt, M. Wenzel, C. Wink, T. Maier, I. Ferrier-Barbut, and T. Pfau, “Observing the Rosensweig instability of a quantum ferrofluid,” Nature 530, 194–197 (2016). [2] L. Chomaz, S. Baier, D. Petter, M. J. Mark, F. Wachtler, L. Santos,and F. Ferlaino, “Quantum-fluctuation-driven crossover from a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate to a macrodroplet in a dipolar quantum fluid,” Phys. Rev. X 6, 041,039 (2016). [3] M. Schmitt, M. Wenzel, F. Bottcher, I. Ferrier-Barbut, and T. Pfau, “Self-bound droplets of a dilute magnetic quantum liquid,” Nature 539, 259–262 (2016). [4] T. D. Lee, K. Huang, and C. N. Yang, “Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of a Bose system of hard spheres and its low-temperature properties,” Phys. Rev. 106, 1135–1145 (1957). [5] D. Baillie, R. M. Wilson, R. N. Bisset, and P. B. Blakie, “Self-bound dipolar droplet:A localized matter wave in free space,” Phys. Rev. A 94, 021,602(R) (2016).    
Fri, October 06 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

Sten Hasselquist,
NMSU

Abstract/Details

The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.
Fri, October 06 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Conformations and Dynamics of Protein Molecular Recognition

Megan Thielgas,
Indiana University

Abstract/Details

Protein dynamics, the population of and interconversion among multiple states, are often evoked to explain function. The experimental characterization of protein dynamics to fully uncover their role however is challenged by both the spatial heterogeneity of proteins and the rapid interconversion of potentially important conformational states. Our group combines the inherent temporal resolution of linear and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy with the spatial resolution afforded by site-selective incorporation of vibrational reporter groups, which provide frequency-resolved absorptions to characterize rapidly occurring changes in local environments in proteins. I will share several vignettes about our application of this approach toward understanding the molecular recognition of protein systems: Src homology 3 domain recognition of proline-rich motifs, cytochrome P450cam regioselectivity, and plastocyanin recognition by cytochrome f. Our studies resolve rapid dynamics at specific locations in the proteins and implicate their involvement in function.
Mon, October 09 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Origin of Supermassive Black Holes

Amy Reines,
Montana State University

Abstract/Details

The origin of supermassive black holes remains a major outstanding issue in modern astrophysics. These monster black holes reside in the nuclei of essentially every massive galaxy and power the most luminous quasars at the edge of the observable Universe. However, directly observing the first “seed” black holes in the early Universe - that can eventually grow to upwards of a billion solar masses - is not feasible with current telescopes. Present-day dwarf galaxies, on the other hand, are within observational reach and offer another avenue to learn about black hole seeds since low-mass galaxies can host relatively pristine black holes. In this talk, I will highlight some of my recent achievements in this field that have taken us from a few rare examples to large systematically assembled samples of dwarf galaxies hosting nuclear black holes. I will also discuss how my work has implications for directly detecting black hole activity in the first galaxies at high redshift.  
Tue, October 10 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
JILA Public Seminar
Structural Phase Transitions for Confined Ions

Shmuel Fishman,
Technion

Abstract/Details

Crystals consisting of ions may be formed as a result of the application of a confining potential. Phase transitions in such crystals result from  the competition between the confining potential and the repulsion between the ions. In one dimension, at zero temperature, at such a transition a zigzag forms. The quantum effects are described by the ising model in a transverse field. two-dimensional structures undergo a buckling instability described by a rich phase diagram. The system is modeled by the six state clock model, exhibiting a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and quasi-long-range order at finite temperatures as well as a transition to quantum long-range order. The models to be presented provide an  idealized  description for experiments on cold atoms. In the seminar joint work in collaboration with Daniel Podolsky, Efrat Shishoni and Giovanna Morigi will be reported.
Wed, October 11 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Kate Ross,
Colorado State University
Fri, October 13 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Toward the Control of Oscillator Strength and Electron Transfer Dynamics in Molecules

David Beratan,
Duke University

Abstract/Details

The most vexing physical challenges in artificial photosynthesis are (1) the weak intrinsic propensity of chromophores to absorb photons and (2) the unfavorable kinetics for producing free carriers with high yield, once an electronic excited state is formed. My seminar focuses on understanding some of the foundational constraints on these key processes, with the aim of using this understanding to develop structures with enhanced performance. We have examined the distribution of oscillator strengths in molecules as a function of frequency to understand why only a few percent of the integrated oscillator strength guaranteed by the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule is available for solar energy harvesting. With this understanding, we are exploring schemes to focus oscillator strength into specific frequency windows. On the topic of charge flow and electron transfer control, we have established a theoretical framework to understand how infra-red excitation may be used to manipulate electron-transfer kinetics. The latter studies may provide schemes to accelerate or slow charge transport on demand.  
Mon, October 16 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Hunting the smallest flares: the first focused hard X-ray observations of the Sun

Lindsay Glesener,
University of Minnesota

Abstract/Details

Despite decades of observation, the high-energy Sun still presents some puzzling mysteries. How do solar flares so efficiently accelerate particles to MeV and GeV scales? What processes heat the corona to millions of degrees? And in direct relation to both of these questions, how do properties of flares scale with the amount of energy released? Bremsstrahlung hard X-rays emitted by hot or nonthermal electrons are useful for probing these questions. High-energy exploration of the Sun is currently undergoing a transformation with the use of directly focusing hard X-ray instruments, as opposed to the previously utilized indirect imagers. Compared with previous instruments, the use of direct focusing offers orders of magnitude better sensitivity as well as higher-fidelity imaging. The first generation of solar-dedicated hard X-ray focusing optics has recently flown on suborbital missions (rockets and balloons). And from low-Earth orbit, the NuSTAR spacecraft, a direct-focusing instrument designed to look at the faintest objects outside the solar system, has observed the Sun on nine separate occasions. This colloquium will cover recent advances in high-energy solar flare physics and will present new results from these novel instruments, concentrating on what we are learning about small-scale energy release on the Sun . Prospects for advances in understanding solar flares and astrophysical particle acceleration will be discussed.
Wed, October 18 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Gilbert Nathanson,
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Fri, October 20 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
Emulator technique for efficient MCMC sampling in 21-cm cosmology experiments

Nicholas Kern,
University of California Berkeley

Abstract/Details

TBA
Fri, October 20 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Symmetry, degeneracy, and strong correlation

Gustavo Scusseria,
Rice University

Abstract/Details

Schrodinger's equation has been known for more than 90 years, yet many pressing questions in electronic structure theory remain unanswered. Quantum Chemistry is a successful field: the weak correlation problem has been solved; we can get "the right answer for the right reason" at reasonably low polynomial computational cost instead of the combinatorial expense of brute force approaches. Despite many advances, however, the so-called strong correlation problem, where the chemist's molecular orbital picture breaks down, remains quite open, particularly for large molecules and solids. This seminar will address challenges and progress on the treatment of strong correlation, and its connection with quantum symmetries and degeneracy. Methods developed in our research group for strong correlation will be discussed, and applications to fullerenes and other carbon nanostructures will be presented.  
Sun, October 22 11:00am
Duane Physics Room G126
CTQM Seminar
Topological winding number measured in a dissipative metamaterial

Eric Rosenthal,
University of Colorado, Boulder

Abstract/Details

We observe a topological phase transition in a non-Hermitian metamaterial composed of resistors, capacitors and tunable inductors. Circuit band structure is measured and used to show that this transition is associated with a dark mode which passes from inside to outside a closed path in the complex space of the system’s eigenvector weights. Lattice excitations acquire a mean displacement that is quantized to within ±8% of an integer value when the system is far from the transition. Our results demonstrate that radio-frequency metamaterials provide an appealing platform to study and harness dissipative topological matter. 
Mon, October 23 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Alex Parker,
Southwest Research Institute

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, October 25 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Andreas Becker,
JILA, University of Colorado
Fri, October 27 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
The Great Space Weather Storm of May 1967: How It Nearly Changed Everything

Delores J. Knipp,
Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, CU Boulder

Abstract/Details

Although listed as one of the most significant solar storms of the last 80 years, the space weather storm of late May 1967 has been largely forgotten. I will explain how the May 1967 storm was nearly one with ultimate societal impact, were it not for the nascent efforts of CU-educated Air Force officers in monitoring and forecasting the extraordinary solar conditions and geospace responses on 23-27 May 1967. On 23 May an initial “great” solar radio burst, which caused radio interference at frequencies between 0.01-9.0 GHz, was accompanied by near-simultaneous disruptions of dayside radio communication by intense fluxes of ionizing solar X-rays. Aspects of military control and communication were immediately challenged. Shortly thereafter a solar energetic particle event interfered with high-frequency communication in the polar cap. Subsequently, record-setting geomagnetic and ionospheric storms compounded the disruptions. I detail three aspects of the storm: The great radio burst; the solar energetic particles; and the surprising effects on upper atmospheric temperature. As noted in Knipp et al. [2016] this was one of the “Great Storms” of the 20th century, despite the lack of reported geomagnetically-induced currents. Radio disruptions such as these warrant the attention of today’s radio-reliant, cellular-phone and satellite-navigation enabled world.
Sat, October 28 9:30am
Old Main Chapel
CU Wizards Program
A Visit with Madame Cure; Special 150th Anniversary of Curie's Birth!

Susan Marie Frontczak,
Master Storyteller
Mon, October 30 3:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
Junctions of weakly-coupled strongly-interacting ultracold systems

Andrea Trombettoni ,
CNR-IOM and SISSA, Trieste

Abstract/Details

After briefly reviewing the use of ultracold atoms for the implementation of quantum devices, I discuss two examples of junctions made by strongly interacting systems weakly coupled between them. I present in the first part of the talk recent results on the Josephson dynamics of two ultracold fermionic gases at the unitary limit weakly linked by a controllable barrier. In the second part I discuss properties of 1D Bose gases and then of junctions of Tonks-Girardeau gases. When three Tonks-Girardeau gases are coupled, one can exactly map their Hamiltonian by means of a suitable Jordan-Wigner transformation into the Hamiltonian of the multichannel Kondo model. I will also show recent results on the experimental realization of Y-geometries with holographic traps.
Mon, October 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Jorge Moreno, Pomona College

Jorge Moreno,
Pomona College

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, November 01 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Jennifer Ross,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Thu, November 02 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Sarang Gopalakrishnan,
CUNY Staten Island
Fri, November 03 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Adventures in Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy

Kit Bowen,
Johns Hopkins University
Mon, November 06 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Characterizing the Environments of Habitable Exoplanets

Kevin France,
University of Colorado - APS
Wed, November 08 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Mark Kasevich,
Stanford University
Thu, November 09 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Charles Reichhardt,
LANL
Fri, November 10 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
TBA

UCLA,
Jean-Luc Margot

Abstract/Details

TBA
Fri, November 10 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
TBA

Christine Keating,
Penn State

Abstract/Details

TBA
Mon, November 13 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
A First Characterization of Tidal Disruption Events and Their Surprising Properties

Iair Arcavi ,
University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract/Details

The search for the tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes (tidal disruption events; TDEs) is now yielding exciting results. In recent years, both gamma- and x-ray candidates as well as optical+UV events have been discovered, and a tantalizing connection to extreme coronal light emitters has been made. It is still not clear what the connection between these very different types of TDE candidates is, but recently we were able to tie several of the optical+UV events together into a coherent class of outbursts. This picture immediately offered two new insights. First, TDE emission properties are not as expected - our set of objects which all peak in the near UV rather than the expected x-rays, show lower than expected velocities and span an unexplained continuum of spectral classes from H-rich to H-poor. The second insight relates to the host galaxies - optical+UV TDEs show a strong (200x!) and unexpected preference for post-starburst galaxies. The reason for this is still not clear. We are collecting more and more observations of TDEs as they are discovered by wide field transient surveys and by our own first- ever specialized survey for TDEs. Understanding TDE emission properties and their peculiar host galaxy preference has far reaching implications for studying quiescent massive black holes, accretion physics and galaxy dynamics.
Sat, November 18 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Immunity in Health & Disease: Superheros Within

Moni Fleshner,
University of Colorado
Mon, November 27 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Relevance of Astronomy to the Earth Sciences

Robert Anderson,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Wed, November 29 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Sridhara Dasu,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, November 30 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Sergej Moroz,
Technical University Munich
Sat, December 02 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Rocks on Mars!

Brian Hynek,
University of Colorado
Mon, December 04 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Mark Rast,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Wed, December 06 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Mark Saffman,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, December 07 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Andrei Bernevig,
Princeton University
Fri, December 08 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Excitons, Disorder, and Nonequilibrium Transport in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

William Tisdale,
MIT

Abstract/Details

In nanostructured materials, the short length and time scales over which energy moves can manifest in transport behavior that deviates from classical constitutive laws. Using a combination of ultrafast laser spectroscopy, time-resolved optical microscopy, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, I will show how these effects manifest in assemblies of colloidal quantum dots (QD) and atomically thin 2D semiconductors, which are promising components of next-generation photovoltaic and lighting technologies. In particular, I will demonstrate the effect of structural and energetic disorder, the role of dimensionality and surface chemistry, and the self-organization of these nanomaterials into ordered superstructures.  
Sun, December 10 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Beth Willman,
University of Arizona
Mon, December 11 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

Beth Willman,
University of Arizona, /LSST

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 13 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Lindley Winslow,
MIT
Sat, January 27 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Speed!

Eric Cornell,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, January 29 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Wen-fai Fong,
University of Arizona
Sat, February 24 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
The Chemistry of Cooking!

David Nesbitt,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, March 05 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Nate Kaib,
University of Oklahoma
Sat, March 17 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Much Ado About Absolute Zero!

Paul Beale,
University of Colorado
Mon, March 19 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

John Wisniewski,
University of Oklahoma
Mon, April 02 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Shelley Wright,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 16 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Quinn Konopacky,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 23 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Daryl Haggard,
McGill University
Sat, April 28 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Sink or Swim!

Mathias Weber,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, April 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Rebekah Dawson,
Penn State
Sat, May 12 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
The Physics of The Game of Thrones!

Rebecca Thompson,
University of Colorado
Sat, June 16 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Blackholes!

Andrew Hamilton,
JILA, University of Colorado

No front page content has been created yet.