Events

Wed, October 18 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Susan Golden

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, October 18 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
The Remarkable Ways in Which Gases Dissolve and React in Water

Gilbert Nathanson,
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Abstract/Details

 Interfacial reactions between atmospheric gases and sea spray play a vital role in our air quality and climate.  These reactions also display fascinating dynamics at the atomic scale.  From this microscopic perspective, the interfacial encounter begins when gas molecules strike the surface of an aqueous solution that might contain ions and biological molecules.  We rely on understanding the physics of these gas-liquid collisions to construct a “blow-by-blow” picture of the solvation and reaction of acids, bases, and oxidizers in such complex solutions.  I will describe experiments using microjets and coated wheels that enable us to explore sea-spray mimics inside a vacuum chamber and help reveal how aerosol-mediated reactions takes place.
Thu, October 19 3:00pm
DLC 1B70
CU Academic Futures Discussions
Undergraduate Research Opportunities

various
Fri, October 20 10:30am
Duane Physics Room G126
CTQM Seminar
TBA

Hong Liu,
MIT
Fri, October 20 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
Emulator technique for efficient MCMC sampling in 21-cm cosmology experiments

Nicholas Kern,
University of California Berkeley

Abstract/Details

TBA
Fri, October 20 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Symmetry, degeneracy, and strong correlation

Gustavo Scusseria,
Rice University

Abstract/Details

Schrodinger's equation has been known for more than 90 years, yet many pressing questions in electronic structure theory remain unanswered. Quantum Chemistry is a successful field: the weak correlation problem has been solved; we can get "the right answer for the right reason" at reasonably low polynomial computational cost instead of the combinatorial expense of brute force approaches. Despite many advances, however, the so-called strong correlation problem, where the chemist's molecular orbital picture breaks down, remains quite open, particularly for large molecules and solids. This seminar will address challenges and progress on the treatment of strong correlation, and its connection with quantum symmetries and degeneracy. Methods developed in our research group for strong correlation will be discussed, and applications to fullerenes and other carbon nanostructures will be presented.  
Mon, October 23 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
New Moons Beyond Neptune: Exploring the companions of worlds within the Kuiper Belt

Alex Parker,
Southwest Research Institute

Abstract/Details

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is far beyond Pluto and plunging through the cold classical Kuiper Belt, a remnant of the primordial disk of material from which the planets formed. On January 1st, 2019, it will conduct an extremely close flyby of the Kuiper Belt Object 2014 MU69, the most distant target of exploration in history and likely the most pristine relic from the era of planet formation ever seen up close. An intensive ground-based stellar occultation campaign recently revealed that 2014 MU69 (like many other Kuiper Belt Objects) may in fact be two worlds in close orbit around one another. I will discuss what we know about the 2014 MU69 system thus far, and what we hope to reveal during New Horizons' fast-approaching flyby. I will further describe ongoing studies of satellite systems on the other end of the mass scale in the Kuiper Belt - the recently-discovered moons of the dwarf planets 2007 OR10 and Makemake. We are conducting a campaign of Hubble observations of these systems to learn about the bulk properties of Kuiper Belt dwarf planets, and discover what they have to tell us about the processes that govern the growth of objects ranging in size from 2014 MU69 (~25 km) to Pluto (~2,380 km).
Wed, October 25 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Amy Palmer

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, October 25 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Andreas Becker,
JILA, University of Colorado
Thu, October 26 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Ravin Bhatt,
Princeton University
Fri, October 27 12:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
TBA

Tara Kahan,
Syracuse University
Fri, October 27 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
The Great Space Weather Storm of May 1967: How It Nearly Changed Everything

Delores J. Knipp,
Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, CU Boulder

Abstract/Details

Although listed as one of the most significant solar storms of the last 80 years, the space weather storm of late May 1967 has been largely forgotten. I will explain how the May 1967 storm was nearly one with ultimate societal impact, were it not for the nascent efforts of CU-educated Air Force officers in monitoring and forecasting the extraordinary solar conditions and geospace responses on 23-27 May 1967. On 23 May an initial “great” solar radio burst, which caused radio interference at frequencies between 0.01-9.0 GHz, was accompanied by near-simultaneous disruptions of dayside radio communication by intense fluxes of ionizing solar X-rays. Aspects of military control and communication were immediately challenged. Shortly thereafter a solar energetic particle event interfered with high-frequency communication in the polar cap. Subsequently, record-setting geomagnetic and ionospheric storms compounded the disruptions. I detail three aspects of the storm: The great radio burst; the solar energetic particles; and the surprising effects on upper atmospheric temperature. As noted in Knipp et al. [2016] this was one of the “Great Storms” of the 20th century, despite the lack of reported geomagnetically-induced currents. Radio disruptions such as these warrant the attention of today’s radio-reliant, cellular-phone and satellite-navigation enabled world.
Sat, October 28 9:30am
Old Main Chapel
CU Wizards Program
A Visit with Madame Cure; Special 150th Anniversary of Curie's Birth!

Susan Marie Frontczak,
Master Storyteller
Mon, October 30 3:00pm
JILA X317
JILA Public Seminar
Junctions of weakly-coupled strongly-interacting ultracold systems

Andrea Trombettoni ,
CNR-IOM and SISSA, Trieste

Abstract/Details

After briefly reviewing the use of ultracold atoms for the implementation of quantum devices, I discuss two examples of junctions made by strongly interacting systems weakly coupled between them. I present in the first part of the talk recent results on the Josephson dynamics of two ultracold fermionic gases at the unitary limit weakly linked by a controllable barrier. In the second part I discuss properties of 1D Bose gases and then of junctions of Tonks-Girardeau gases. When three Tonks-Girardeau gases are coupled, one can exactly map their Hamiltonian by means of a suitable Jordan-Wigner transformation into the Hamiltonian of the multichannel Kondo model. I will also show recent results on the experimental realization of Y-geometries with holographic traps.
Mon, October 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Galaxy Mergers on FIRE-2

Jorge Moreno,
Pomona College

Abstract/Details

TBA
Tue, October 31 10:00am
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Surviving and Thriving as Students of Color in STEM

Jorge Moreno,
Pomona College
Wed, November 01 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
Transient Crosslinkers Tune the Patterns of Microtubule Filaments

Jennifer Ross,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Abstract/Details

The cell is a complex autonomous machine taking in information, performing computations, and responding to the environment. To enable agile read/write capabilities, much of the molecular biochemistry that performs these computations must be transient and weak, allowing signals to be carried as a function of the concentration of numerous and coupled interactions. Traditionally, biochemical experiments can only measure strongly interacting systems that can last for long times in dilute concentrations. We have developed microscopy measurements to enable to visualization of weak, transient interactions and the resulting emergent behaviors of coupled systems. I will present excerpts from stories where many weak, transient interactions can have strong repercussions on the overall activity and can, in fact, overpower strongly interacting systems. These studies involve the microtubule cytoskeleton and the transport motor, kinesin-1.  Our results reveal a fundamentally important aspect of cellular self-organization: weak, transient interacting species can tune their interaction strength directly by tuning the local concentration to act like a rheostat. The tunability of weak, transient interactions is a fundamental activity of biological systems, and our insights will ultimately enable us to learn how to engineer these systems to create biological or biomimetic devices. Biography: Ross is the director of the new Massachusetts Center for Autonomous Materials (MassCAM) and an award-winning biophysicist studying the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton and microtubule-based enzymes using high-resolution single molecule imaging techniques. She has a degree in Physics and has studied the microtubule cytoskeleton for over a decade. As a Cottrell Scholar, Ross has pioneered innovative teaching techniques that are being adopted around the world. Specifically, she has taught at several international short courses on microscopy including Analytical and Quantitative Microscopy (AQLM) at the Marine Biology Laboratory and the Bangalore Microscopy Course at the National Centre for Biological Science in Bangalore, India. She has also served as the President of NESM in the past. She is also an advocate for women and under-represented groups and has a blog to help others make it in academics.
Fri, November 03 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Adventures in Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy

Kit Bowen,
Johns Hopkins University
Mon, November 06 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
Characterizing the Environments of Habitable Exoplanets

Kevin France,
University of Colorado - APS

Abstract/Details

High-energy photons and particles from stars regulate the atmospheric temperature structure and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the long-term stability of planetary atmospheres and the production of potential “biomarker” gases. Rocky planets orbiting low-mass stars (M dwarfs) will likely be the first exoplanets directly probed for signs of life, however, relatively few observational and theoretical constraints exist on the high-energy irradiance from typical (i.e., weakly active) M dwarf exoplanet host stars. In this talk, I will describe results from an ongoing panchromatic survey (Chandra/XMM/Hubble/ground) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts. The MUSCLES* Treasury Survey combines UV, X-ray, and optical observations, reconstructed Lyman-alpha and EUV (10-90 nm) radiation, and next-generation stellar atmosphere models to provide realistic inputs for modeling the stability and climate on potentially habitable planets around red dwarfs. I will present an overview of the project and focus on three main results – 1) the evolution of the high-energy spectral energy distribution as a star’s habitable zone moves inward from 1 to 0.1 AU, including implications for the possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, 2) new estimates of the high-energy particle fluxes (from CMEs/SEPs) from these stars based on solar UV flare/particle flux measurements, and 3) characterization of the high-energy variability on active and inactive M dwarfs, with an emphasis on the potential for these impulsive events to drive large-scale atmospheric mass loss. I will conclude by presenting a short summary of our prospects for spectroscopically characterizing the atmospheres of potentially inhabited planets around M dwarfs in the next ~20 years. * Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems
Wed, November 08 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Francisco Asturias

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, November 08 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Mark Kasevich,
Stanford University
Thu, November 09 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Charles Reichhardt,
LANL
Fri, November 10 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
TBA

Christine Keating,
Penn State

Abstract/Details

TBA
Mon, November 13 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
A First Characterization of Tidal Disruption Events and Their Surprising Properties

Iair Arcavi ,
University of California, Santa Barbara

Abstract/Details

The search for the tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes (tidal disruption events; TDEs) is now yielding exciting results. In recent years, both gamma- and x-ray candidates as well as optical+UV events have been discovered, and a tantalizing connection to extreme coronal light emitters has been made. It is still not clear what the connection between these very different types of TDE candidates is, but recently we were able to tie several of the optical+UV events together into a coherent class of outbursts. This picture immediately offered two new insights. First, TDE emission properties are not as expected - our set of objects which all peak in the near UV rather than the expected x-rays, show lower than expected velocities and span an unexplained continuum of spectral classes from H-rich to H-poor. The second insight relates to the host galaxies - optical+UV TDEs show a strong (200x!) and unexpected preference for post-starburst galaxies. The reason for this is still not clear. We are collecting more and more observations of TDEs as they are discovered by wide field transient surveys and by our own first- ever specialized survey for TDEs. Understanding TDE emission properties and their peculiar host galaxy preference has far reaching implications for studying quiescent massive black holes, accretion physics and galaxy dynamics.
Wed, November 15 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Julius Lucks

Abstract/Details

TBA
Thu, November 16 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Sarang Gopalakrishnan,
CUNY Staten Island
Sat, November 18 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Immunity in Health & Disease: Superheros Within

Moni Fleshner,
University of Colorado
Mon, November 27 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Relevance of Astronomy to the Earth Sciences

Robert Anderson,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Wed, November 29 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Jacob Corn

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, November 29 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Sridhara Dasu,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, November 30 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Sergej Moroz,
Technical University Munich
Sat, December 02 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Rocks on Mars!

Brian Hynek,
University of Colorado
Mon, December 04 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The continuing saga of supergranulation

Mark Rast,
University of Colorado, Boulder
Wed, December 06 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Craig Crew

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 06 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Mark Saffman,
University of Wisconsin
Thu, December 07 12:00pm
Duane Physics Room G126
Condensed Matter Seminar
TBA

Andrei Bernevig,
Princeton University
Fri, December 08 12:00pm
JILA 10th Floor - Foothills Room
Astrophysics Lunch Seminar
Dynamics of satellite galaxies of the MW and M31

Nicolas Garavito, Ekta Patel,
University of Arizona
Fri, December 08 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Phys Chem/Chem Phys Seminar
Excitons, Disorder, and Nonequilibrium Transport in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

William Tisdale,
MIT

Abstract/Details

In nanostructured materials, the short length and time scales over which energy moves can manifest in transport behavior that deviates from classical constitutive laws. Using a combination of ultrafast laser spectroscopy, time-resolved optical microscopy, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, I will show how these effects manifest in assemblies of colloidal quantum dots (QD) and atomically thin 2D semiconductors, which are promising components of next-generation photovoltaic and lighting technologies. In particular, I will demonstrate the effect of structural and energetic disorder, the role of dimensionality and surface chemistry, and the self-organization of these nanomaterials into ordered superstructures.  
Mon, December 11 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

Beth Willman,
University of Arizona, /LSST

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 13 3:30pm
JSCBB Butcher Auditorium
Biochemistry Seminar
TBA

Donald Bryant

Abstract/Details

TBA
Wed, December 13 4:00pm
Duane Physics Room G1B20
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA

Lindley Winslow,
MIT
Sat, January 27 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Speed!

Eric Cornell,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, January 29 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Wen-fai Fong,
University of Arizona
Sat, February 24 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
The Chemistry of Cooking!

David Nesbitt,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, March 05 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Nate Kaib,
University of Oklahoma
Sat, March 17 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Much Ado About Absolute Zero!

Paul Beale,
University of Colorado
Mon, March 19 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

John Wisniewski,
University of Oklahoma
Mon, April 02 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Shelley Wright,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 16 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Quinn Konopacky,
University of California, San Diego
Mon, April 23 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Daryl Haggard,
McGill University
Sat, April 28 9:30am
Cristol Chemistry Room 140
CU Wizards Program
Sink or Swim!

Mathias Weber,
JILA, University of Colorado
Mon, April 30 4:00pm
JILA Auditorium
Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences Seminar
TBA

Rebekah Dawson,
Penn State
Sat, May 12 9:30am
Duane Physics Room G1B30
CU Wizards Program
Power, Grace, Wisdom, and Wonder: The Physics of The Game of Thrones!

Rebecca Thompson,
University of Colorado
Sat, June 16 9:30am
CU Planetarium
CU Wizards Program
Blackholes!

Andrew Hamilton,
JILA, University of Colorado

No front page content has been created yet.